Visualising the Invisible: from single molecule Super-Resolution to Patient

Course date: 12 April 2013 - 12 April 2013
Location: Erasmus MC, Ae-406

Click here for details of programme


Jointly organized symposium by the Erasmus Optical Imaging Centre (OIC) and the Applied Molecular Imaging program at Erasmus MC (AMIE).
The OIC is the expert centre for advanced optical imaging knowledge and equipment. AMIE provides a platform for scientists interested in animal imaging technology and molecular imaging in general.

Topic of this symposium
Advanced imaging techniques have led to key discoveries in life science and medicine. Over the last two decades imaging techniques have expanded incredibly and now enable visualisation of processes ranging from single molecules to the level of whole patient imaging.
The aim of this symposium is to present the latest developments and make the link between optical and molecular imaging. Speakers will cover topics ranging from super resolution single molecule cellular imaging, multi-photon, intravital and whole animal imaging to translational research in patients.

Audience
This symposium is designed for PhD students and researchers of the Erasmus MC; PhD students and researchers from other universities are also welcome.
The total number of participants in the course is limited to 100.

Organizing committee
Gert-Jan Kremers, dept of Pathology/Erasmus OIC (g.kremers@erasmusmc.nl),
Joost Haeck, dept. of Radiology/AMIE (j.haeck@erasmusmc.nl)
Frank van Vliet and Joris Lenstra, Managing Director, Erasmus Postgraduate School Molecular Medicine (molmed@erasmusmc.nl)

Marion de Jong, dept. of Nuclear Medicine/Radiology/AMIE
Monique Bernsen, dept. of Radiology/Nuclear Medicine/AMIE
Jolanda Meijer, dept. of Radiology/AMIE
Jeroen Essers, dept. of Cell Biology & Genetics & Radiotherapy/AMIE
Adriaan Houtsmuller, dept. of Pathology/Erasmus OIC
Gert van Cappellen, dept. of Pathology/Erasmus OIC

This symposium is sponsored by:



Click here for details of programme


Click here for the other items